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Table Glass Composition

The following images are examples of Glass Composition


Colorless Glass


Colorless Leaded Glass


18PR175 Oxon Hill Manor



18BC32 H & S Bakery
Feature 21 Privy 19th c.

 


18BC79  Ruth Saloon
Privy filled 1826-1837



Colorless leaded stemmed glass with annular knop over teared ball knop. Round funnel shaped bowl. This shape dates this vessel to ca. 1720-1750. Lot 2339 - from 18PR175. Colorless leaded glass, probable tumbler.  Roughly finished glass tipped pontil. 2.5” base diameter. Lot 17. 18BC32 Colorless leaded glass, probable tumbler.  Roughly finished glass tipped pontil. 2.5” base diameter. Lot 17. 18BC32 Colorless leaded molded open salt. 18BC79

Colorless leaded stemmed glass with
annular knop over teared ball knop. Round
funnel shaped bowl. This shape dates this
vessel to ca. 1720-1750. Lot 2339.

Colorless leaded glass, probable tumbler.
Roughly finished glass tipped pontil.
2.5” base diameter. Lot 17

Colorless leaded press molded open salt.


18BC32 H & S Bakery
Feature 21 Privy 19th c.



18BC38 Clagett Brewery
Peters’ Privy, late 18th to early
19th centuries


Colorless leaded contact molded cruet or castor with ribbed decoration.  Glass tipped pontil. Base diameter: 1.5”. Lot 17, 21-L1-138. 18BC32-F21 Colorless leaded pressed glass dish lid.  Scalloped edge and stippled background.  Rim diameter: 6.5”. 18BC32-F21 Colorless leaded cut glass hollow vessel (bowl?) with scalloped rim. Rim diameter:  5.00”. Lot: 14, Provenience: 1HA.671.105, Privy Stratum 4. 18BC38

Colorless leaded contact molded cruet or
castor with ribbed decoration.  Glass tipped
pontil. Base diameter: 1.5”. Lot 17, 21-L1-138

Colorless leaded press molded hollow
vessel, possibly compote. Unidentified lacy pressed glass pattern with stippled
background and serrated rim.
Rim diameter: 6.50”.

Colorless leaded cut glass hollow vessel
(bowl?) with scalloped rim. Rim diameter:
5.00”. Lot: 14, Provenience: 1HA.671.105,
Privy Stratum 4.


Colorless Soda Lime Glass


18BC38 Clagett Brewery
Feature 1 Peters’ Privy, late 18th
to early 19th centuries




18BC27 Federal Reserve
Feature 30  Privy (circa 1850-1870)


18CV13 Brewhouse
Lot 2 – part of a large assemblage discarded under the house in the early 20th century and found during renovation


Colorless soda lime stemmed glasses with plain stems. Base diameter: 2.36”. Lot: 14, 1HA.667.3 and 850.4, Privy Stratum 4. 18BC38Colorless soda lime stemmed glasses with plain stems. Base diameter: 2.36”. Lot: 14, 1HA.667.3 and 850.4, Privy Stratum 4. 18BC38 Colorless soda lime glass firing glass? Note very thick base to glass 8-sided base and bowl. 2.75” base diameter (at widest point).  18BC27-F30Colorless soda lime glass firing glass? Note very thick base to glass 8-sided base and bowl. 2.75” base diameter (at widest point).  18BC27-F30 Ribbed domed sugar bowl or butter dish lid? 18CV13

Colorless soda lime stemmed glasses with
plain stems. Base diameter: 2.36”.
Lot: 14, 1HA.667.3 and 850.4,
Privy Stratum 4.

Colorless soda lime glass firing glass?
Note very thick base to glass 8-sided base
and bowl. 2.75” base diameter
(at widest point).

Colorless soda lime press molded
compote lid.  


18FR134 Schifferstadt Site
Feature 4 Privy (c. 1830-1860)



18CV13 Brewhouse
Lot 2 – part of a large assemblage discarded under the house in the early 20th century and found during renovation


18ST71
Lot 8-12B

Colorless soda lime glass decanter.  Ground interior neck. Rim diameter: 1 3/16”, Lot 537. 18FR134-F4 Colorless soda lime glass decanter.  Ground interior neck. Rim diameter: 1 3/16”, Lot 537. 18FR134-F4 Colorless - glass square bowl, possibly “Plume” pattern. The Plume pattern was produced by Adams & Company, circa 1890; United States Glass Co., circa 1891. 18CV13 Colorless - glass square bowl, possibly “Plume” pattern. The Plume pattern was produced by Adams & Company, circa 1890; United States Glass Co., circa 1891. 18CV13 Colorless soda lime glass pressed  Button and daisy dish. Many companies produced daisy and button from the mid 19th to 20th centuries.
Colorless soda lime glass decanter.
Ground interior neck. Rim
diameter: 1 3/16”, Lot 537.
Colorless soda lime press molded square
bowl, possibly “Plume” pattern. The Plume
pattern was produced by Adams & Company, circa 1890; United States Glass Co.,
circa 1891 (McCain 1982:394-95).

Colorless soda lime glass pressed. Button
and daisy dish. Many companies produced
daisy and button from the mid 19th
to 20th centuries. Similar to dish design
on right from a private collection.


Colorless Potash Lime Glass

We currently have no images of this table glass composition type


Colorless Borosilicate Glass

We currently have no images of this table glass composition type


Colored Glass


Opaque Glass


18BC27 Federal Reserve
Feature 38 Privy 1870-1910


18PR175 Oxon Hill Manor
Area I Well, MC827


18ST71 Ocean Hall
Late 17th-century standing structure


Hollow vessel (possible shot glass or toothpick holder?) of opaque green glass. Base diameter: 1 1/8”. 18BC27 Opaque white glass, possible bowl, molded (?)-18PR175. Opaque blue glass molded lid. 2.75” diameter, Lot 8-9B. 18ST71

Hollow vessel (possible shot glass or
toothpick holder?) of opaque green glass.
Base diameter: 1 1/8”.

Opaque white glass, possible bowl,
molded (?). 6” diameter.

Opaque blue glass molded lid.
2.75” diameter, Lot 8-9B.

Opaque white pressed glass was relatively common before the 1870s, but in the later 1870s, British and American manufacturers
began to produce yellows, blues, greens, blacks and ivory opaque glass (Jones 2000:147).

18CV7Charles´┐Ż Gift/Preston Cliff


Opaque pale green press molded glass in unidentified hollow form. Lot 2. 18CV7 Opaque turquoise blue press molded glass in unidentified hollow form. Lot 2. 18CV7.

Opaque pale green press molded glass in
unidentified hollow form. Lot 2

Opaque turquoise blue press molded glass in
unidentified hollow form. Lot 2.


18CV60 Angelica Knoll
c. 1680-1750

Opaque white glass blue chalcedony tea bowl.  1.25” diameter of white glass ring which was the footring of a tea bowl. The chalcedony technique of imitating semi-precious stones was mastered in Venice in the 15th century (Grulich 2004:21).Opaque white glass blue chalcedony tea bowl.  1.25” diameter of white glass ring which was the footring of a tea bowl. The chalcedony technique of imitating semi-precious stones was mastered in Venice in the 15th century (Grulich 2004:21). “Black” or amethyst table glass hollow vessel with overlays of white glass.  Black table glass was made in the Netherlands, Venice and England and the deep purple color was achieved with manganese or iron metallic oxide (Grulich 2004:19). Considered Facon de Venise. 18CV60

Opaque white glass blue chalcedony tea bowl.  1.25” diameter
of white glass ring which was the footring of a tea bowl. The
chalcedony technique of imitating semi-precious stones was
mastered in Venice in the 15th century (Grulich 2004:21).

 

“Black” or amethyst opaque glass hollow vessel with overlays
of white opaque glass.   Black table glass was made in the
Netherlands, Venice and England and the deep purple color was
achieved with manganese or iron metallic oxide (Grulich 2004:19).
The white design was created by trailing threads of white glass
around the vessel.  The glass was sometimes combed to create a
“sgraffado” motif (Rimer 2017). Considered Facon de Venise.

18CV279 – Compton
c. 1651-1685


18ST390 Mattapany Manor and Magazine

Courtesy Naval District Washington, Naval Air Station Patuxent River

Mottled opaque white glass with red and blue. Indeterminate hollow vessel. Vessel 47. Opaque white (lattimo) glass hollow vessel with pattern molded ribs.  Although these fragments are too small to make a positive identification, the ribs may have been part of a form of decoration known as “nipt diamond waies” (Lanmon 2001:82).  In this technique, adjacent vertical ribs were manipulated with pinchers to form a diamond pattern (Corning Museum of Glass).  This form of decoration was used between circa 1690 and the 1740s (Hughes 1956:211). Lots 195 and 39. 18ST390.Colorless leaded jelly glass, English, c. 1720

On right: colorless leaded jelly glass, English, c. 1720. https://scottishantiques.com/nipt-diamond-waies

Opaque white glass with red and blue
color mottled glass. Indeterminate hollow
vessel. Vessel 47.

Opaque white (lattimo) glass hollow vessel with pattern
molded ribs.  Although these fragments are too small to make
a positive identification, the ribs may have been part of a form of
decoration known as “nipt diamond waies” (Lanmon 2001:82).
  In this technique, adjacent vertical ribs were manipulated with
pinchers to form a diamond pattern (Corning Museum of Glass).
This form of decoration was used between circa 1690 and the
1740s (Hughes 1956:211). Lots 195 and 39.


Transparent Colored Glass


18BC27 Federal Reserve
Feature 38 Privy 1870-1910



18CH821 Serenity’s Surprise
17th-century domestic site



18CV271 Patuxent Point
1658 – 1690s


Green glass lamp glass or perfume bottle with gold painted motif and ground lip. Rim diameter: 5/16”. 18BC27

Stamped raspberry prunt in green colored glass.  Test Unit 23, Lot 115. 18CH821

Stamped raspberry prunt in green colored glass. Diameter: .75”. Lot 138. 18CV271Similar to prunts shown on 17th century wine glass on the right from a private collection.

Green glass lamp glass or perfume bottle
with gold painted motif and ground lip.
Rim diameter: 5/16”.

Stamped raspberry prunt in green colored
glass.  Test Unit 23, Lot 115.

Stamped raspberry prunt in green colored
glass. Diameter: .75”. Lot 138. Similar to
prunts shown on 17th century wine glass
on the right from a private collection.


18CH821 Serenity’s Surprise
17th-century domestic site


18CV91 Smith St. Leonard
c. 1711-1754


18QU28  Bennett’s Point
Lot 81 - 1675-1765

Blue prunt, probably from winged serpent of dragon flute glass.  Facon de Venise glass.  Similar example to right  made in the Netherlands between 1675 and 1700.  Similar examples found at St. Mary’s City in a number of 17th-century contexts and at Smith’s St. Leonard (18CV91), dated c. 1711-1754. Test Unit 51, Lot 179. 18CH821 Blue prunt from winged serpent of dragon flute glass.  Facon de Venise glass.  Similar example to right  made in the Netherlands between 1675 and 1700.  Similar examples found at St. Mary’s City in a number of 17th-century contexts.   Blue prunt from winged serpent of dragon flute glass.  Facon de Venise glass.  Similar example to right  made in the Netherlands between 1675 and 1700.  Similar examples found at St. Mary’s City in a number of 17th-century contexts. Purple table glass with colorless soda lime glass prunt that has been pincered into a vertical fin decoration (Lanmon page 71).  Running through the center of the prunt is a twisted cable stem of colorless soda lime glass with encased twists of red and white cane. 18QU28 Purple table glass with colorless soda lime glass prunt that has been pincered into a vertical fin decoration (Lanmon page 71).  Running through the center of the prunt is a twisted cable stem of colorless soda lime glass with encased twists of red and white cane.

Blue prunt, probably from winged serpent
of dragon flute glass.  Test Unit 51, Lot 179.
Facon de Venise glass. 

Blue prunt from winged serpent of dragon
flute glass.  Facon de Venise glass. Similar
example to right  made in the Netherlands
between 1675 and 1700.  (Taken from van
Eck 1995:267). Similar example to right of
both fragments was made in the Netherlands
between 1675 and 1700.

Purple table glass with colorless soda lime
glass prunt that has been pincered into a
vertical fin decoration (Lanmon page 71).
Running through the center of the prunt is
a twisted cable stem of colorless soda lime
glass with encased twists of red and
white cane. This vessel may be some variant
of a winged serpent or dragon flute glass.


18BC163  UMB Block 12
Feature 1 – Late 19th/early
20th century privy




18CH821 Serenity’s Surprise
17th-century domestic site


18ST74 Notley Hall
c. 1664-1695

Amber glass unidentified hollow vessel with a molded hobnail motif. 18BC163

Blue comet prunt from a comet beaker.  Comet beakers were made in the Netherlands in the 17th century (Grulich 2004:18).  A similarly-shaped prunt of colorless leaded glass was found at the Smith’s Outbuilding (c. 1670-1690) at St. Mary’s City, Maryland. Considered Facon de Venise - from 18ST74.Comet beaker from http://collectie.boijmans.nl/en/object/915

http://collectie.boijmans.nl/
en/object/915

Photo courtesy of Dr. Julia A. King,
St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Blue comet prunt from a comet beaker.  Comet beakers were made in the Netherlands in the 17th century (Grulich 2004:18).  A similarly-shaped prunt of colorless leaded glass was found at the Smith’s Outbuilding (c. 1670-1690) at St. Mary’s City, Maryland. Considered Facon de Venise - from 18ST74.Comet beaker from http://collectie.boijmans.nl/en/object/915

http://collectie.boijmans.nl/
en/object/915

Amber glass unidentified hollow vessel
with a molded hobnail motif.
Hobnails date post 1880.
Possibly a prunt from a comet beaker.
 Test Unit 5, Lot 59.
Blue comet prunt from a comet beaker.
Comet beakers were made in the Netherlands in the 17th century (Grulich 2004:18).  A similarly-shaped
prunt of colorless leaded glass was found at the Smith’s Outbuilding (c. 1670-1690) at
St. Mary’s City, Maryland. Considered Facon de Venise.

18CV13 Brewhouse
Lot 2 – part of a large assemblage discarded under the house in the early 20th century and found during renovation

Amber glass “Bird on Branch mug; part of Beaded Handle set produced by the Bryce Brothers in the 1880s, when the company may have been known as Bryce, Walker & Co. The Brewhouse mug is missing its pleated skirt base. Amber glass “Bird on Branch mug; part of Beaded Handle set produced by the Bryce Brothers in the 1880s, when the company may have been known as Bryce, Walker & Co. The Brewhouse mug is missing its pleated skirt base. 18CV13       Complete amber glass “Bird on Branch mug; part of Beaded Handle set produced by the Bryce Brothers in the 1880s, when the company may have been known as Bryce, Walker & Co. The Brewhouse mug is missing its pleated skirt base from a private collection.    Complete amber glass “Bird on Branch mug; part of Beaded Handle set produced by the Bryce Brothers in the 1880s, when the company may have been known as Bryce, Walker & Co. The Brewhouse mug is missing its pleated skirt base from a private collection.

Amber transparent press molded glass “Bird on Branch mug; part of Beaded Handle set produced by the Bryce Brothers in the 1880s,
when the company may have been known as Bryce, Walker & Co.  The Brewhouse mug is missing its pleated skirt base.
Complete examples on right from a private collection.

This mug was made in a three-part mold with the mold seams hidden in the trunks of the trees.
Handles pressed in the mold rather than separately applied began in the 1870s.


18CV480 Parran Park Farm
Feature 4 midden


Molded pink Depression Glass tumbler. Lot 331. -18CV480 Amber molded “depression” glass plate or platter with floral motif, in Sharon/Cabbage Rose pattern produced by Federal Glass Company, 1935-1939. Lot 331. -18CV480 Aqua press molded table glass of unidentified hollow form, with star motifs. Lot 322. 18CV480

Molded pink Depression Glass
tumbler. Lot 331.

Amber molded “depression” glass plate
or platter with floral motif, in Sharon/
Cabbage Rose pattern produced by
Federal Glass Company, 1935-1939.
Lot 331

Aqua press molded table glass of
unidentified hollow form, with star
motifs. Lot 322.


Opalescent Glass


18BC27 Federal Reserve
Feature 38 Privy 1870-1910



Private Collection


Tumbler of opalescent pattern glass, American made, probably 1870s-1890s. Height:  3 5/8”; Rim diameter:  2.75”; Base diameter: 2.50”. 18BC27 Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920. Private Coll.         Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920. Private Coll.

Tumbler of opalescent pattern glass, American made, probably
1870s-1890s. Height:  3 5/8”, Rim diameter:  2.75”,
Base diameter: 2.50”.

This type of swirl pattern was produced by a number of manufacturers in the
last quarter of the 19th century and first decade of the 20th century
(Heacock and Gamble 1987).

Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white
raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920.

Uranium Glass


18CV13 Brewhouse
Lot 2 – part of a large assemblage discarded under the house
in the early 20th century and found during renovation


Private Collection

 

 

Uranium Glass fragments, possibly a vase similar to one shown on right from a private collection. From 18CV13.    Uranium Glass fragments, possibly a vase similar to one shown on right from a private collection. From 18CV13.

Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920. Private Coll.         Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920. Private Coll.

Uranium Glass fragments, possibly a vase similar to one shown on right from a private collection. Pictured under both normal and UVb lighting. Exterior (left) and interior (right) of opalescent uranium glass vase. Opalescent glass typified by milky white edge or white
raised pattern decorating a colored pressed glass vessel.  Many
U.S. factories produced between 1880 and 1920.
Uranium glass began to gain popularity in US in the 1830s and continued in regular production until just before WWII.  Enamel painted, possibly
produced by northern Bohemian Harrach Glass Factory, in what is today the Czech Republic.

Back to: Top | Table Glass Introduction | Table Glass Decoration | Table Glass Vessel Forms


Thumbnail image of a yellow ware undecorated soup plate - when clicked on will open a larger image. Thumbnail image of an undecorated plate, impressed mark Sharpe’s Derbyshire on reverse.  Thomas Sharpe (Sharpe, Brothers & Co.) company began production c. 1821 - when clicked will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a yellow ware undecorated soup plate sherd - when clicked will open a larger image view.  Thumbnail image of a banded yellow ware mug from 18BC27, when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a bulbous shaped banded pitcher from 18BC27, when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a creamer or gravy server with molded floral motif from 18BC27, when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a banded yellow ware mug with applied handle from 18BC27, when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a yellow ware undecorated flower pot - when clicked on will open a larger image. Thumbnail image of a large bowl fragment with applied slip in blue from 18BC27, when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a mocha thistle pattern jug from a private collection - when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a Molded mixing bowl with an apple green glaze from a private collection - when clicked on will open a larger image view. Thumbnail image of a candlestick with flint - when clicked on will open a larger image view. Molded and green glazed vessel of indeterminate form – probably serving dish.  Green glaze covers both the interior and exterior of the vessel. Molded and green glazed vessel of indeterminate form – probably large plate or serving dish.  Green glaze covers both the interior and exterior of the vessel. Molded and green glazed vessel of indeterminate form – probably serving dish or large plate.  Green glaze covers both the interior and exterior of the vessel. Unidentified hollow vessels, one molded with a corn kernel motif and the other a basket weave.  The corn molded fragment has a pale pink interior glaze. Corn was a popular motif in majolica ceramics. Pitcher in private collection. This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century. Dipped pearlware mug with greyish-brown slip, to which sprig molded figures have been applied.  This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century. In this closup of vessel on left, in the damaged area above the legs in the figure on the right, the unglazed greyish color of the slip is visible where portions of the sprig molded design have flaked away. Bone china saucer with light blue floral motif.  Note that the floral basket is enclosed within a larger molded motif. Bone china bowl, possibly a slop bowl, with a light blue thistle and shamrock sprig molded motif.  This vessel is badly stained - possibly known as Chelsea sprig pattern, dated by the Museum Victoria in Victoria, Australia as circa 1880, based on archaeological context. Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design. Closeup detail of plate shown on left - Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design. Printed mark “WEDGWOOD of Etruria & Barlaston, Made in England” dating after c. 1940 (Godden 1964:660).  The impressed mark reads “Wedgwood 4 C 65”, meaning that this vessel was made in April of 1965 (Godden 1964:659). Bone china sugar dish with blue floral sprigging.  It is part of a largely complete teaware set previously owned by the Ogle family, former owners of Belair Museum. This bone china cup in the Blue Chelsea pattern bears the post 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25), attesting to the production of this type of sprig decorated ware into the second half of the twentieth century. Copyright © 2002 by Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab
Updated:  07/10/18